What is Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA)?

  “The quality of human life, perhaps even the survival of life as we know it, depends on finding ways to make everyone’s environment more nurturing–less coercive and more caring, supportive of human development, and focused on doing what works."      – Anthony Biglan

“The quality of human life, perhaps even the survival of life as we know it, depends on finding ways to make everyone’s environment more nurturing–less coercive and more caring, supportive of human development, and focused on doing what works."  – Anthony Biglan

What is Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA)?

Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) is a time-tested and data-based strategy utilized for teaching individuals. It is specifically shown to help those on the autism spectrum. Studies have shown that individualized ABA techniques can help individuals learn skills, such as (but not limited to):

Communication

Labeling

Visual Skills

Following Directions

Back-and-forth conversation

Relationship-building

Play Skills

Independent Living Skills

School Skills (Group, Social & Academic)

 

How does it work?

ABA interventions are NOT a "One-Size-Fits-All" approach.

Every aspect of ABA intervention is customized to each child's skills, needs, interests, preferences and family situation.

We choose from evidence-based assessment tools based on each individual's needs, goals, environmental parameters, and other contextual variables.

We then create individualized treatment plans with input always coming from the client themselves (when applicable) along with their parents and caretakers.

An ABA program is an ongoing process that will continuously be monitored, implemented and revised based off of the child's progress and changing goals.

Child blowing bubbles.jpeg

What should I expect from an ABA Therapy Program?

A behavioral program is a comprehensive intervention carried out (as much as possible) in every setting and every available moment. Programs include one-to-one teaching from a Registered Behavior Technician (RBT), small-group/peer/sibling participation to work on social skills, family training and participation in program development, constant evaluation and support from a Behavior Analyst and support in the community for generalization of skills.

What does this mean for my child?

ABA relies heavily on setting up an individual's environment to enable them to learn in a way that is motivating and encouraging. It may seem odd to use the word “behavior” when talking about learning to talk, play and interact with others, but to a behaviorist, all of these skills are behaviors that CAN be taught.

The behavior-consequence relation is the most important and widely applied principle of behavior analysis. To put it simply - when a behavior is reinforced, it will reoccur! ABA uses these principles to set up a constantly reinforcing environment so that an individual is motivated and rewarded for everything they learn!